CULTURE AND RELIGION ON WOMEN’S REPRODUCTIVE HEALTHCARE IN RURAL BANGLADESH


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Authors

  • HELEN MANNAN Researcher, Department of Anthropology, University of Dhaka.

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.46291/IJOSPERvol6iss1pp38-53

Keywords:

Culture, Religion, Women’s Reproductive Healthcare, Rural Bangladesh.

Abstract

Health and healthcare of a community is largely determined by the culture, religion and behavior the people of the community hold. People’s culture including religion, values, beliefs and behavior during health and illness are important variables in studying health and healthcare. The present study has dealt with how and to what extent the culture, religion and practices of rural Bangladesh affect its women’s reproductive health and healthcare. Finally, the study tends to conclude that the rural culture and religion exerts significant negative impact on women’s reproductive healthcare.

References

UNFPA, State of World Population 2008: Reaching Common Ground: Culture, Gender and Human Rights, UNFPA, 2008, p. 12.

Therese Blanchet, Meanings and Rituals of Birth in Rural Bangladesh, UPL, 1992, p. 39.

In Rathura I have talked with Shefali (16) who is still feels very much shy about her menstruation even after 5 years of her menstrual experience. She didn’t want to talk with me, her mami (aunt) described about her first experience of menstruation.

Semai and paesh are two traditional homemade foods in rural Bangladesh.

Rural villagers have strong belief in ghost though they can’t observe it.

It has been observed in the research field.

Older women of Rathura are less conscious than younger. Education, media (both print and electronic), healthcare facilities all were absent during their time.

Mr. Rafiq is a family planning worker in Rathura though the villagers called him as

Dr. because of his 20 years of healthcare service.

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Published

2019-04-04

How to Cite

HELEN MANNAN. (2019). CULTURE AND RELIGION ON WOMEN’S REPRODUCTIVE HEALTHCARE IN RURAL BANGLADESH. International Journal of Social, Political and Economic Research, 6(1), 38–53. https://doi.org/10.46291/IJOSPERvol6iss1pp38-53

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